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CEO Advisor® Newsletter
October 2019
7 Rules When Selling a Business to a Strategic Buyer
It can be very appealing for a CEO or business owner to sell their business on their own to a strategic buyer, especially when the CEO has been approached by the strategic buyer. There are other options to selling your business such as selling to a Private Equity firm, but we are going to focus on strategic buyers only in this article.  

When a buyer approaches a company directly, the business owner may feel they can avoid some of the work and time involved in preparing to put the business on the market. The CEO may be able to maintain the confidentiality of the sale by dealing with only one buyer. The business owner may also feel he/she can save on the fee to an M&A advisor or intermediary. 
 
As with most major issues such as selling a business, there is a real price that a CEO or business owner pays when going down this path solo, including having no competitive bidders resulting in disadvantageous terms that can be extremely costly.  Your business may be your most valuable asset and is a very dynamic, complex thing to sell requiring a lot of knowledge, preparation and experience. If you would not sell your own home, you certainly do not want to go into a 6 to 9 month process to prepare, market and sell your own business.

Here are some critical issues to remember when dealing with a strategic buyer: 
It takes time to sell a business and it takes even more time to deal with multiple buyers. The original Information Request from the strategic buyer coupled with a Letter of Intent may seem manageable by some CEOs, but the subsequent Due Diligence process will be extremely time consuming and taxing at a time when you need to stay focused on your business and continue to drive sales.

Even the prep work of supplying the initial set of information to the prospective buyer and negotiating the Letter of Intent can be overwhelming to a first or second time seller. Hire a professional to sell your business. Don't risk taking time away from it to "do it yourself" and have the sales and profits of your business falter as a result, which could jeopardize the price or completing the sale altogether.

Don't get lured into discussions and believe the strategic buyer. More importantly, don't get your advice from the buyer. The buyer is not looking out for your best interests and there are many issues and questions you want to avoid that will tip your hand on price and terms that you don't want to divulge. Remember that they are pros at buying companies and you will be at a distinct disadvantage if this is your first time experiencing this movie play out.

Check the buyer's credit and get a confidentiality agreement signed before you deal with strategic buyers. Don't give them any information about your business beyond your marketing materials or other publicly available information until an NDA is signed.

Get a team of strong advisors looking out for your interests - an M&A advisor like CEO Advisor, Inc., a seasoned corporate/transaction attorney, and a CPA/tax advisor that regularly handles mergers and acquisitions transactions. This is money well spent and may be one of the best investments you will make.

Have your M&A advisor provide comparable sales information in order to be knowledgeable about your approximate business valuation. A strategic buyer that has bought a number of businesses in your industry in the past doesn't mean that they are paying good prices for them or know the full value of your business. You need a professional opinion of what your business should sell for and professionally prepared information about your business to optimize the value and to increase the probability of an attractive offer.

A purchase price based solely on an Earn Out is not a standard way to sell a business. An Earn Out is where the price is based on how the business performs after the purchase based on how well the seller runs the business. Any aspect of the sale price that includes an Earn Out should be well defined and a specific way to track and get paid on the Earn Out portion of the sale, if any, from a financially strong buyer. Cash is king and you want a substantial amount of your purchase price in cash.

Don't deal with only one buyer. In this situation, the buyer tends to hold the upper hand, particularly after an offer to buy the business is accepted. If an M&A advisor is handling the sale, buyers understand that there are most likely other buyers that will buy the business if they make unreasonable demands.
One of the benefits of selling to a strategic buyer is that the buyer may be willing to pay more for the business than a financial buyer such as a Private Equity firm, because doing so will increase their sales or profits by more than the two businesses do separately. Using an M&A process to sell the business with professionally prepared information in a Data Room and multiple interested buyers from a large list of targeted buyers is the best method to obtain the highest price and get a transaction completed.  

Contact Mark Hartsell, MBA, President of CEO Advisor, Inc. for a no cost initial consultation at (949) 629-2520, by email at MHartsell@CEOAdvisor.com or visit us at www.CEOAdvisor.com for more information.
It can be very appealing for a CEO or business owner to sell their business on their own to a strategic buyer, especially when the CEO has been approached by the strategic buyer. There are other options to selling your business such as selling to a Private Equity firm, but we are going to focus on strategic buyers only in this article.  

When a buyer approaches a company directly, the business owner may feel they can avoid some of the work and time involved in preparing to put the business on the market. The CEO may be able to maintain the confidentiality of the sale by dealing with only one buyer. The business owner may also feel he/she can save on the fee to an M&A advisor or intermediary. 
 
As with most major issues such as selling a business, there is a real price that a CEO or business owner pays when going down this path solo, including having no competitive bidders resulting in disadvantageous terms that can be extremely costly.  Your business may be your most valuable asset and is a very dynamic, complex thing to sell requiring a lot of knowledge, preparation and experience. If you would not sell your own home, you certainly do not want to go into a 6 to 9 month process to prepare, market and sell your own business.

Here are some critical issues to remember when dealing with a strategic buyer: 
It takes time to sell a business and it takes even more time to deal with multiple buyers. The original Information Request from the strategic buyer coupled with a Letter of Intent may seem manageable by some CEOs, but the subsequent Due Diligence process will be extremely time consuming and taxing at a time when you need to stay focused on your business and continue to drive sales.

Even the prep work of supplying the initial set of information to the prospective buyer and negotiating the Letter of Intent can be overwhelming to a first or second time seller. Hire a professional to sell your business. Don't risk taking time away from it to "do it yourself" and have the sales and profits of your business falter as a result, which could jeopardize the price or completing the sale altogether.

Don't get lured into discussions and believe the strategic buyer. More importantly, don't get your advice from the buyer. The buyer is not looking out for your best interests and there are many issues and questions you want to avoid that will tip your hand on price and terms that you don't want to divulge. Remember that they are pros at buying companies and you will be at a distinct disadvantage if this is your first time experiencing this movie play out.

Check the buyer's credit and get a confidentiality agreement signed before you deal with strategic buyers. Don't give them any information about your business beyond your marketing materials or other publicly available information until an NDA is signed.

Get a team of strong advisors looking out for your interests - an M&A advisor like CEO Advisor, Inc., a seasoned corporate/transaction attorney, and a CPA/tax advisor that regularly handles mergers and acquisitions transactions. This is money well spent and may be one of the best investments you will make.

Have your M&A advisor provide comparable sales information in order to be knowledgeable about your approximate business valuation. A strategic buyer that has bought a number of businesses in your industry in the past doesn't mean that they are paying good prices for them or know the full value of your business. You need a professional opinion of what your business should sell for and professionally prepared information about your business to optimize the value and to increase the probability of an attractive offer.

A purchase price based solely on an Earn Out is not a standard way to sell a business. An Earn Out is where the price is based on how the business performs after the purchase based on how well the seller runs the business. Any aspect of the sale price that includes an Earn Out should be well defined and a specific way to track and get paid on the Earn Out portion of the sale, if any, from a financially strong buyer. Cash is king and you want a substantial amount of your purchase price in cash.

Don't deal with only one buyer. In this situation, the buyer tends to hold the upper hand, particularly after an offer to buy the business is accepted. If an M&A advisor is handling the sale, buyers understand that there are most likely other buyers that will buy the business if they make unreasonable demands.
One of the benefits of selling to a strategic buyer is that the buyer may be willing to pay more for the business than a financial buyer such as a Private Equity firm, because doing so will increase their sales or profits by more than the two businesses do separately. Using an M&A process to sell the business with professionally prepared information in a Data Room and multiple interested buyers from a large list of targeted buyers is the best method to obtain the highest price and get a transaction completed.  

Contact Mark Hartsell, MBA, President of CEO Advisor, Inc. for a no cost initial consultation at (949) 629-2520, by email at MHartsell@CEOAdvisor.com or visit us at www.CEOAdvisor.com for more informationContact Mark Hartsell, MBA, President of CEO Advisor, Inc. for a no cost initial consultation at (949) 629-2520, by email at MHartsell@CEOAdvisor.com or visit us at www.CEOAdvisor.com for more information.
It can be very appealing for a CEO or business owner to sell their business on their own to a strategic buyer, especially when the CEO has been approached by the strategic buyer. There are other options to selling your business such as selling to a Private Equity firm, but we are going to focus on strategic buyers only in this article.  

When a buyer approaches a company directly, the business owner may feel they can avoid some of the work and time involved in preparing to put the business on the market. The CEO may be able to maintain the confidentiality of the sale by dealing with only one buyer. The business owner may also feel he/she can save on the fee to an M&A advisor or intermediary. 
 
As with most major issues such as selling a business, there is a real price that a CEO or business owner pays when going down this path solo, including having no competitive bidders resulting in disadvantageous terms that can be extremely costly.  Your business may be your most valuable asset and is a very dynamic, complex thing to sell requiring a lot of knowledge, preparation and experience. If you would not sell your own home, you certainly do not want to go into a 6 to 9 month process to prepare, market and sell your own business.

Here are some critical issues to remember when dealing with a strategic buyer: 
It takes time to sell a business and it takes even more time to deal with multiple buyers. The original Information Request from the strategic buyer coupled with a Letter of Intent may seem manageable by some CEOs, but the subsequent Due Diligence process will be extremely time consuming and taxing at a time when you need to stay focused on your business and continue to drive sales.

Even the prep work of supplying the initial set of information to the prospective buyer and negotiating the Letter of Intent can be overwhelming to a first or second time seller. Hire a professional to sell your business. Don't risk taking time away from it to "do it yourself" and have the sales and profits of your business falter as a result, which could jeopardize the price or completing the sale altogether.

Don't get lured into discussions and believe the strategic buyer. More importantly, don't get your advice from the buyer. The buyer is not looking out for your best interests and there are many issues and questions you want to avoid that will tip your hand on price and terms that you don't want to divulge. Remember that they are pros at buying companies and you will be at a distinct disadvantage if this is your first time experiencing this movie play out.

Check the buyer's credit and get a confidentiality agreement signed before you deal with strategic buyers. Don't give them any information about your business beyond your marketing materials or other publicly available information until an NDA is signed.

Get a team of strong advisors looking out for your interests - an M&A advisor like CEO Advisor, Inc., a seasoned corporate/transaction attorney, and a CPA/tax advisor that regularly handles mergers and acquisitions transactions. This is money well spent and may be one of the best investments you will make.

Have your M&A advisor provide comparable sales information in order to be knowledgeable about your approximate business valuation. A strategic buyer that has bought a number of businesses in your industry in the past doesn't mean that they are paying good prices for them or know the full value of your business. You need a professional opinion of what your business should sell for and professionally prepared information about your business to optimize the value and to increase the probability of an attractive offer.

A purchase price based solely on an Earn Out is not a standard way to sell a business. An Earn Out is where the price is based on how the business performs after the purchase based on how well the seller runs the business. Any aspect of the sale price that includes an Earn Out should be well defined and a specific way to track and get paid on the Earn Out portion of the sale, if any, from a financially strong buyer. Cash is king and you want a substantial amount of your purchase price in cash.

Don't deal with only one buyer. In this situation, the buyer tends to hold the upper hand, particularly after an offer to buy the business is accepted. If an M&A advisor is handling the sale, buyers understand that there are most likely other buyers that will buy the business if they make unreasonable demands.
One of the benefits of selling to a strategic buyer is that the buyer may be willing to pay more for the business than a financial buyer such as a Private Equity firm, because doing so will increase their sales or profits by more than the two businesses do separately. Using an M&A process to sell the business with professionally prepared information in a Data Room and multiple interested buyers from a large list of targeted buyers is the best method to obtain the highest price and get a transaction completed.  

Contact Mark Hartsell, MBA, President of CEO Advisor, Inc. for a no cost initial consultation at (949) 629-2520, by email at MHartsell@CEOAdvisor.com or visit us at www.CEOAdvisor.com for more information.

It can be very appealing for a CEO or business owner to sell their business on their own to a strategic buyer, especially when the CEO has been approached by the strategic buyer. There are other options to selling your business such as selling to a Private Equity firm, but we are going to focus on strategic buyers only in this article.
  
When a buyer approaches a company directly, the business owner may feel they can avoid some of the work and time involved in preparing to put the business on the market. The CEO may be able to maintain the confidentiality of the sale by dealing with only one buyer. The business owner may also feel he/she can save on the fee to an M&A advisor or intermediary.
 
As with most major issues such as selling a business, there is a real price that a CEO or business owner pays when going down this path solo, including having no competitive bidders resulting in disadvantageous terms that can be extremely costly.  Your business may be your most valuable asset and is a very dynamic, complex thing to sell requiring a lot of knowledge, preparation and experience. If you would not sell your own home, you certainly do not want to go into a 6 to 9 month process to prepare, market and sell your own business.

Here are some critical issues to remember when dealing with a strategic buyer:

1. It takes time to sell a business and it takes even more time to deal with multiple buyers. The original Information Request from the strategic buyer coupled with a Letter of Intent may seem manageable by some CEOs, but the subsequent Due Diligence process will be extremely time consuming and taxing at a time when you need to stay focused on your business and continue to drive sales.

2. Even the prep work of supplying the initial set of information to the prospective buyer and negotiating the Letter of Intent can be overwhelming to a first or second time seller. Hire a professional to sell your business. Don't risk taking time away from it to "do it yourself" and have the sales and profits of your business falter as a result, which could jeopardize the price or completing the sale altogether.

3. Don't get lured into discussions and believe the strategic buyer. More importantly, don't get your advice from the buyer. The buyer is not looking out for your best interests and there are many issues and questions you want to avoid that will tip your hand on price and terms that you don't want to divulge. Remember that they are pros at buying companies and you will be at a distinct disadvantage if this is your first time experiencing this movie play out.

4. Check the buyer's credit and get a confidentiality agreement signed before you deal with strategic buyers. Don't give them any information about your business beyond your marketing materials or other publicly available information until an NDA is signed.

5. Get a team of strong advisors looking out for your interests - an M&A advisor like CEO Advisor, Inc., a seasoned corporate/transaction attorney, and a CPA/tax advisor that regularly handles mergers and acquisitions transactions. This is money well spent and may be one of the best investments you will make.

6. Have your M&A advisor provide comparable sales information in order to be knowledgeable about your approximate business valuation. A strategic buyer that has bought a number of businesses in your industry in the past doesn't mean that they are paying good prices for them or know the full value of your business. You need a professional opinion of what your business should sell for and professionally prepared information about your business to optimize the value and to increase the probability of an attractive offer. A purchase price based solely on an Earn Out is not a standard way to sell a business. An Earn Out is where the price is based on how the business performs after the purchase based on how well the seller runs the business. Any aspect of the sale price that includes an Earn Out should be well defined and a specific way to track and get paid on the Earn Out portion of the sale, if any, from a financially strong buyer. Cash is king and you want a substantial amount of your purchase price in cash.

7. Don't deal with only one buyer. In this situation, the buyer tends to hold the upper hand, particularly after an offer to buy the business is accepted. If an M&A advisor is handling the sale, buyers understand that there are most likely other buyers that will buy the business if they make unreasonable demands.

One of the benefits of selling to a strategic buyer is that the buyer may be willing to pay more for the business than a financial buyer such as a Private Equity firm, because doing so will increase their sales or profits by more than the two businesses do separately. Using an M&A process to sell the business with professionally prepared information in a Data Room and multiple interested buyers from a large list of targeted buyers is the best method to obtain the highest price and get a transaction completed. 

Contact Mark Hartsell, MBA, President of CEO Advisor, Inc. for a no cost initial consultation at (949) 629-2520, by email at MHartsell@CEOAdvisor.com or visit us at www.CEOAdvisor.com for more information.
Planning, Forecasting and Goal Setting for 2020
When you evaluate the management practices of hundreds of technology companies, here are the primary reasons they fail. 
Evaluate your own management decisions and practices and seek help from a business consultant or business advisor to address your
specific needs.
1. Lack of Market Focus
Emerging technology companies often do anything possible to generate revenue and in the process try to be all things to all people. Worried about losing business they avoid segmenting the market and refuse to focus on one to three key vertical markets. As a result, the company is unable to effectively serve any market segments effectively and management is suddenly swamped with support problems and competitors.
2. Undifferentiated Products
Most technology products and services that fail do so because of a lack of differentiation. Successful companies differentiate their product from all other products on the market. Differentiation is possible on the bases of five fundamental factors: function, time utility, problem solved, price and positioning. These five elements are critical to uniquely positioning your products and services to achieve success and profits.
3. Poor Market Research
Many companies routinely perform the wrong type of market research. Statistical surveys of customers alone do not provide the qualitative information that is needed. Because your target audience often relies as much on perceptions as on facts, qualitative research intended to identify existing needs has equal or greater value in assessing, planning and executing a company's marketing strategy.
4. Excessive Product Improvement
Technology products and services are generally used over an extended period of time, are integrated with complementary products and impose learning costs on customers. Customers require time to implement and recover their investment in high-tech products. The rapid introduction of new and improved versions can make a customer regret a previous purchase, delay all new purchases, and agonize over similar purchases in the future. Additionally, the time and costs related to excessive product development can delay product launches and delay sales opportunities and revenues.
5. Incomplete Products
Customers view products very differently than the technology companies that create or supply them. Technology companies tend to try to sell products on the basis of price, special features and technical specifications. These technical factors are often favored by the engineers who typically run technology companies. The problem is that most customers consider factors such as product support and company reputation to be more important. 
6. Failure to Establish the Right Competitive Barriers
Traditional barriers to competition are of little value in the technology industry. Patents can be effective but are very expensive, divulge trade secrets and take years to come to fruition. Conventional techniques are mostly designed to prevent market entry and tend not to work in technology-based businesses. The most effective competitive barriers in high-tech are the perceptions held by customers and prospects of product differentiation and first to market with a specialization in a market segment.
7. Using Price Alone to Drive Market Transformation
It is easy to misinterpret the role price plays in the market. And it is a mistake to believe that a technology product or service would be widely used and purchased if its cost was low enough. Price is a function of value and utility, and products and services should be positioned and marketed accordingly.
8. Improper Marketing
Marketing is both an art and a science. Positioning, pricing, sales strategy, target vertical markets and other factors contribute to the success or failure of your products and services and the corresponding sales. A well-crafted marketing plan is critical to success. Improper marketing or lack of marketing can be a product killer or cripple your company as a whole.
9. Sales Mismanagement
There's more to sales management than most companies realize. Specific skills are required to effectively manage each type of sales channel and those skills must be developed internally starting with an effective direct sales force. Unique management challenges exist for each primary type of sales channel: direct selling, online sales, dealers, OEMs, alliance partners and value-added resellers (VARs). Seek a business consultant or business advisor to assist you in optimizing your sales strategy as a critical factor in your success.
10. Misinterpretation of the Technology Adoption Lifecycle Model
The primary technology adoption lifecycle model describes the market acceptance of new products in terms of Innovators, Early Adopters, Early Majority, Late Majority, and Laggards. The process of adoption over time is illustrated as a classic normal distribution or "bell curve".
Because the technology adoption model is expressed in terms of a standard bell curve, it means statistically, a random sample of any given market or population must contain: 2.5% Innovators, 13.5% Early Adopters, 34% Early Majority, 34% Late Majority, and 16.0% Laggards. So no matter what industry you tend to be in, there will always be a sequence of adoption by different types of buyers.
When you evaluate the management practices of hundreds of technology companies, here are the primary reasons they fail. 
Evaluate your own management decisions and practices and seek help from a business consultant or business advisor to address your
specific needs.
1. Lack of Market Focus
Emerging technology companies often do anything possible to generate revenue and in the process try to be all things to all people. Worried about losing business they avoid segmenting the market and refuse to focus on one to three key vertical markets. As a result, the company is unable to effectively serve any market segments effectively and management is suddenly swamped with support problems and competitors.
2. Undifferentiated Products
Most technology products and services that fail do so because of a lack of differentiation. Successful companies differentiate their product from all other products on the market. Differentiation is possible on the bases of five fundamental factors: function, time utility, problem solved, price and positioning. These five elements are critical to uniquely positioning your products and services to achieve success and profits.
3. Poor Market Research
Many companies routinely perform the wrong type of market research. Statistical surveys of customers alone do not provide the qualitative information that is needed. Because your target audience often relies as much on perceptions as on facts, qualitative research intended to identify existing needs has equal or greater value in assessing, planning and executing a company's marketing strategy.
4. Excessive Product Improvement
Technology products and services are generally used over an extended period of time, are integrated with complementary products and impose learning costs on customers. Customers require time to implement and recover their investment in high-tech products. The rapid introduction of new and improved versions can make a customer regret a previous purchase, delay all new purchases, and agonize over similar purchases in the future. Additionally, the time and costs related to excessive product development can delay product launches and delay sales opportunities and revenues.
5. Incomplete Products
Customers view products very differently than the technology companies that create or supply them. Technology companies tend to try to sell products on the basis of price, special features and technical specifications. These technical factors are often favored by the engineers who typically run technology companies. The problem is that most customers consider factors such as product support and company reputation to be more important. 
6. Failure to Establish the Right Competitive Barriers
Traditional barriers to competition are of little value in the technology industry. Patents can be effective but are very expensive, divulge trade secrets and take years to come to fruition. Conventional techniques are mostly designed to prevent market entry and tend not to work in technology-based businesses. The most effective competitive barriers in high-tech are the perceptions held by customers and prospects of product differentiation and first to market with a specialization in a market segment.
7. Using Price Alone to Drive Market Transformation
It is easy to misinterpret the role price plays in the market. And it is a mistake to believe that a technology product or service would be widely used and purchased if its cost was low enough. Price is a function of value and utility, and products and services should be positioned and marketed accordingly.
8. Improper Marketing
Marketing is both an art and a science. Positioning, pricing, sales strategy, target vertical markets and other factors contribute to the success or failure of your products and services and the corresponding sales. A well-crafted marketing plan is critical to success. Improper marketing or lack of marketing can be a product killer or cripple your company as a whole.
9. Sales Mismanagement
There's more to sales management than most companies realize. Specific skills are required to effectively manage each type of sales channel and those skills must be developed internally starting with an effective direct sales force. Unique management challenges exist for each primary type of sales channel: direct selling, online sales, dealers, OEMs, alliance partners and value-added resellers (VARs). Seek a business consultant or business advisor to assist you in optimizing your sales strategy as a critical factor in your success.
10. Misinterpretation of the Technology Adoption Lifecycle Model
The primary technology adoption lifecycle model describes the market acceptance of new products in terms of Innovators, Early Adopters, Early Majority, Late Majority, and Laggards. The process of adoption over time is illustrated as a classic normal distribution or "bell curve".
Because the technology adoption model is expressed in terms of a standard bell curve, it means statistically, a random sample of any given market or population must contain: 2.5% Innovators, 13.5% Early Adopters, 34% Early Majority, 34% Late Majority, and 16.0% Laggards. So no matter what industry you tend to be in, there will always be a sequence of adoption by different types of buyers.
October, November and December should be your planning months to prepare for 2020 and maximize your opportunity for success. Planning, forecasting and goal setting are critical to any company, large or small.

CEO Advisor, Inc. works with CEOs, presidents and business owners of small and mid-size companies on strategy, growth, funding, mergers and acquisitions and the key to a successful year is up-front strategy and planning.

Conversely, if you are not committing the needed time and focus on planning, forecasting and goal setting for the upcoming year, you are leaving a lot of money on the table and risk your business and your livelihood near and long-term.

Planning
Planning for growth or an exit doesn't mean just having a meeting with your staff or updating a brief business plan and going back to your daily routine. Business planning is a critical aspect of your business that enables you to rethink, adjust, plan, research, strategize, prioritize, focus and allocate resources to your largest opportunities, while minimizing wasted time and resources.

Planning For Growth or an Exit
Planning for organic growth, growth by acquisition, growth through funding, or planning an exit strategy and sale of your business takes discipline, expertise, the ability to strategize and mobilize around a focused effort. Execution is the follow-on implementation of your 2020 Plan in a well thought out, concentrated effort. If you are not executing on your Plan, you are wasting time and money, missing opportunities, burning valuable resources and causing irreparable harm to your company, many times on a permanent basis.

Forecasting
Creating a monthly Financial Forecast of Sales, Cost of Goods Sold (COGS or costs directly related to providing your products and services), Gross Profit (Sales minus COGS), Gross Profit Margin (Gross Profit divided by Sales), Expenses (Overhead), Net Profit and Net Profit Margin (Net Profit divided by Sales) is paramount to effectively running your business.

Additionally, a monthly Financial Forecast enables you to compare your actual results to your Forecast, proactively make needed adjustments to your business, eliminate wasted time and resources, increase Gross Margins and maximize your Profits.
Without a monthly Forecast, you are flying blind throughout the year with no metrics or financial goals. This, again, will have you leaving a lot of money on the table that will never be recovered. Forecasting is a straight forward process and a key part of planning for the new year that can be one of the biggest drivers of success and profits. Seek help from a seasoned business advisor to ensure success with this process.

Goal Setting
Goal setting should entail all aspects of your business including:
a) Company goals
b) Management goals
c) Growth goals
d) Financial goals
e) Sales goals
f) Sales per Employee goals
g) Gross Profit and Gross Profit Margin goals
h) Net Profit and Net Profit Margin goals
i) Optimizing Financial Ratios
j) Other measureable goals to grow your business to the next level.

Without setting measurable goals, you and your employees may spend the majority of 2020 going day to day in a constant cycle of reactive tasks instead of proactively focusing on and accomplishing your goals, executing on your Plan, and maximizing sales and profits and the value of your business.

When I meet with CEOs of small and mid-size businesses throughout the year, they typically cannot answer the simple question, "What are your goals for this year?" They throw out short answers such as, "Grow the business", or "Sales", but cannot go beyond this and answer the question distinctly with their four to eight primary goals to drive their businesses forward to build profits and substantial value toward an optimal exit in the future.

This is due to a lack of planning, forecasting and goal setting and is a major deterrent to success and profits. CEO Advisor, Inc. provides expertise and experience to quickly and effectively assist you in planning, forecasting and goal setting for 2020. We address your specific needs with hands-on action, expertise and seasoned advice.

Contact Mark Hartsell, MBA, President of CEO Advisor, Inc. for a no cost initial consultation at (949) 629-2520, by email at MHartsell@CEOAdvisor.com or visit us at www.CEOAdvisor.com for more information.

Testimonial  


"Mark Hartsell and CEO Advisor provided amazing hands-on guidance from the start of the sale process through to the closing. Not having sold a company before I was not aware of the complexity, and tremendous amount of time and expertise required by someone like Mark to prepare for the sale, locate a qualified buyer, negotiate a strong offer, perform the extensive due diligence process, and drive the process through to legal contracts and closing. CEO Advisor, Inc. was the catalyst in achieving a highly successful sale."

CEO
Professional Services Company (After Their Successful Sale)

CEO/President, Engineering Services/Manufacturing Company


Whether it is growing a business to the next level, turning a distressed company around or preparing a company for an exit, Mark's firm, CEO Advisor, Inc, provides a broad range of services and Mark is there for the CEO every step of the way."

 


Partner

Haynes & Boone, LLP

Words of Wisdom


"The pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. The optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty."

Winston Churchill
Prime Minister of the U.K.